SSL Options with Kubernetes – Part 1

In this post (and future posts) we will continue to look into questions our clients have asked about using Docker Enterprise that have prompted us to do some further research and/or investigation. Here we are going to look into the options for enabling secure communications with our applications running under Kubernetes container orchestration on a Docker Enterprise cluster.

The LoadBalancer type of a service in Kubernetes is available if you are using one of the major public clouds, AWS, Azure or GCP, via their respective cloud provider implementations. An Ingress resource is available on any Kubernetes cluster including both on-premises and in the cloud. Both LoadBalancer and Ingress provide the capability to terminate SSL traffic. In this post will show how this is accomplished with an AWS LoadBalancer service.

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The Power in a Name

My full name is Mark Allen Miller. You can find my profile on LinkedIn under my full name https://www.linkedin.com/in/markallenmiller/. I went to college with two other Mark Millers. One of them also had the same middle initial as me so my name is not the most unique name in the world. My dad’s name is Siegfried Miller. At the age of 18, because he could “change the world”, he changed his last name from Mueller to Miller and yep, he doesn’t have a middle name. My grandfather’s name is Karl Mueller. His Austrian surname, prior to immigrating to the US in 1950, was Müller with an umlaut which is a mark ( ¨ ) used over a vowel to indicate a different vowel quality. Interesting trivia you might say, but what does this have to do with Docker?

Well, Docker originally had the name dotCloud. According to wikipedia “Docker represents an evolution of dotCloud’s proprietary technology, which is itself built on earlier open-source projects such as Cloudlets.” I had never even heard of Cloudlets until I wrote this blog.

Docker containers have names also. These names give us humans something a little more interesting to work with instead of the typical container id such as 648f7f486b24. The name of a container can be used to identify a running instance of an image, but it can also be used in most commands in place of the container id.

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Kubernetes tolerations working together with Docker UCP scheduler restrictions

In this blog post we´ll take a look at how the scheduler controls in Docker UCP interact with Kubernetes taints and tolerations. Both are used to control what workloads are allowed to run on manager and DTR (Docker Trusted Registry) nodes. Docker EE UCP mangers nodes are also Kubernetes master nodes, and in production systems it is important to restrict what runs on the manager (master) and DTR nodes. We’ll walk through deploying a Kubernetes workload on every node in a Docker EE cluster.

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