32-bit Apps in a 64-bit Docker Container

I started my career in December of 1989 at a company named Planning Research Corporation which contracted a considerable amount of work with the Department of Defense. I spent one year working in Fortran 77. The next 6 years were far more interesting to me as I dove into the world of ANSI C programming using the Kernighan & Ritchie bible. I still have my book on a shelf.

Our systems ran on 3 different Unix operating systems. We managed Makefiles that targeted SunOS, DEC Ultrix, and IBM AIX platforms. At times this was quite challenging. However, everything in this environment was 32 bit architecture; but what did that matter to me at the time? 64 bit processors didn’t come along for many more years.

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How to securely deploy Docker EE on the AWS Cloud

Overview

This reference deployment guide provides the step-by-step instructions for deploying Docker Enterprise Edition on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud. This automation references deployments that use the Docker Certified Infrastructure (DCI) template which is based on Terraform to launch, configure and run the AWS compute, network, storage and other services required to deploy a specific workload on AWS. The DCI template uses Ansible playbooks to configured the Docker Enterprise cluster environment.

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SSL Options with Kubernetes – Part 1

In this post (and future posts) we will continue to look into questions our clients have asked about using Docker Enterprise that have prompted us to do some further research and/or investigation. Here we are going to look into the options for enabling secure communications with our applications running under Kubernetes container orchestration on a Docker Enterprise cluster.

The LoadBalancer type of a service in Kubernetes is available if you are using one of the major public clouds, AWS, Azure or GCP, via their respective cloud provider implementations. An Ingress resource is available on any Kubernetes cluster including both on-premises and in the cloud. Both LoadBalancer and Ingress provide the capability to terminate SSL traffic. In this post will show how this is accomplished with an AWS LoadBalancer service.

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The Power in a Name

My full name is Mark Allen Miller. You can find my profile on LinkedIn under my full name https://www.linkedin.com/in/markallenmiller/. I went to college with two other Mark Millers. One of them also had the same middle initial as me so my name is not the most unique name in the world. My dad’s name is Siegfried Miller. At the age of 18, because he could “change the world”, he changed his last name from Mueller to Miller and yep, he doesn’t have a middle name. My grandfather’s name is Karl Mueller. His Austrian surname, prior to immigrating to the US in 1950, was Müller with an umlaut which is a mark ( ¨ ) used over a vowel to indicate a different vowel quality. Interesting trivia you might say, but what does this have to do with Docker?

Well, Docker originally had the name dotCloud. According to wikipedia “Docker represents an evolution of dotCloud’s proprietary technology, which is itself built on earlier open-source projects such as Cloudlets.” I had never even heard of Cloudlets until I wrote this blog.

Docker containers have names also. These names give us humans something a little more interesting to work with instead of the typical container id such as 648f7f486b24. The name of a container can be used to identify a running instance of an image, but it can also be used in most commands in place of the container id.

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Using a Private Registry in Kubernetes

Docker Trusted Registry (DTR) in a Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) cluster allows users to create a private image repository for their own use. They may want to do this when they want to use the cluster for their work but don’t want to or can’t use their own system or they’re not ready yet to share it with others. However, using a private image repository in a Kubernetes deployment requires some additional steps. In this post, I will show you how to setup the repository and use it in your deployment.
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Functional Kubernetes Namespaces in Docker Enterprise

For Kubernetes in a Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 2.1 cluster, namespaces can be used to segregate objects and, with Role Based Access Control (RBAC), designate which users or groups can do what within each of them. In this post, we are going to create three namespaces for development, test and production environments, four groups for the development, test, operations and management teams and access controls defining what each of these groups can do in each of these namespaces.
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Docker Clustering Approaches

Most enterprises have a structured release management process that allows phased deployment between multiple environments including development, test, model (stage or acceptance), and production.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deployment_environment.

With Docker Enterprise Swarm you can generally setup these environments in one of the following ways: Single Cluster, Multi-Env Cluster, Geo-Single Clusters, and Geo-Multi-Env Cluster.  I will explain these different approaches and help you determine when each approach might be useful in your enterprise.  Of course, there are a myriad of variations on each of these that you could employ to suit your own needs.
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Docker Layer 7 Routing – Host Mode

It’s been nearly 3 months since my last blog about new the Layer 7 Routing (aka Interlock) in Docker Enterprise 2.0. It’s been a journey of up’s and down’s to get this to work, scale, and become stable enough for a production environment. I’m not sure we can declare total success just yet.

Near the end of my previous blog post I mentioned that there is an alternative configuration for Interlock regarding overlay networks. You could utilize Interlock’s host mode networking. Docker states the following:

By default layer 7 routing leverages the Docker Swarm routing mesh, but you don’t have to. You can use host mode networking for maximum performance.

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Interlock for Docker Swarm

In early 2018 Docker made an announcement of the release of its newest Docker Enterprise 2.0 product.  This newest release provides a significant advancement in the Docker platform in the form of a choice between Swarm and/or Kubernetes orchestration. But that’s not what i want to talk about.

Layer 7 Routing

Another great addition to the platform is the replacement of the HTTP Routing Mesh, known as HRM, with a new Layer 7 routing and load balancing. This latest enhancement is built upon the new Interlock 2.0 architecture which provides a highly scalable and highly available routing solution for Swarm.  Interlock provides the same functionality as HRM but also includes 2 new features: 1) path based routing and 2) SSL termination.
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